MNPR Blog

Friday, May 21, 2004

Blogging, RSS and ATOM the wave of Tomorrow

Last Friday I wrote a piece discussing whether blogging should be considered a form of journalism or not. Well, it may or may not help my argument for blogs as a PR tool, but Microsoft CEO Bill Gates told executives gathered at Microsoft's headquarters for its annual CEO Summit that blogs are making it very easy for people to communicate.

Here is an excerpt from a Reuters article covering the annual Microsoft meeting:

Blogs, short for Weblogs, have been around for several years, serving as online journals for Web-savvy disseminators of information ranging from personal ramblings, product reviews, to social commentary.

The growth in the number of blogs, and those who read them, however, is attracting greater attention from businesses as a means to communicate more directly with their employees, partners and customers...

...The growth in the number of blogs, and those who read them, however, is attracting greater attention from businesses as a means to communicate more directly with their employees, partners and customers.

That's due in part to the way that blogging has driven the adoption of yet another technology, called Real Simple Syndication (RSS), which allows blog readers to track freshly posted information without having to browse through a long list of home pages. Instead, many subscribe to RSS feeds on blogs so that they can read them on desktops as they come in.

Gates described to his audience, which included Warren Buffett, Jeff Bezos, Michael Dell, Carly Fiorina, Barry Diller and other top business executives, how blogs worked and suggested that they could be used as a tool for businesses to communicate with customers.

"It's getting away from the drawbacks of e-mail and the drawbacks of a Web site,' Gates said, "We're progressively getting better and better at it..."

...Google, the No. 1 Web search company that has announced plans to go public, recently upgraded its Blogger.com service, which it bought in 2003, by adding features that allow users to publish content from any e-mail-enabled device, such as cell phones and handheld devices.

Instead of RSS, however, Google is also promoting a rival syndication standard called Atom.

As the debate rages on, its leaders are looking to the future of the Web with anticipation, are you?

Looking for a RSS/ATOM reader? Try RSSFeedEater.

Get my ATOM Feed here or my RSS Feed here.